Pulse of Asia 2022

Speaker's biography and Meeting abstract

Jinho Shin, MD, PhD
Professor and Chief of Cardiology at the Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine,  Hanyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea,
Professor Jinho Shin is Professor and Chief of Cardiology at the Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, at Hanyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, Korea, a role he has held since 2013. Prof. Shin undertook his medical degree at Hanyang University College of Medicine, completing his MS and PhD at the same institution.

In 2002, Prof. Shin was a Clinical Fellow at Weil Cornell Medical College, New York, USA before returning to Korea to take up an Assistant Professor role the following year.

In addition to his role at Hanyang University Seoul Hospital, Prof. Shin is the head of Cardiology Division, and the Director of the PaikNam Cardiovascular Center. He is a member of a number of societies and has published extensively on his research interests. His research is mainly focused on cardiovascular prevention and hypertension in clinical and epidemiological fields.

Currently, he is the director of Scientific Committee in Korean Society of Hypertension, coordinator of the Guideline Committee for the Korean Society of Hypertension, and President-elect in Korean Society of Hypertension. 

 

Meeting abstract

Lecture title:
Clinic, home and ambulatory blood pressures
Jinho Shin
Faculty of Cardiology Service, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea

Intensive blood pressure lowering treatment requires more intensive monitoring for patient safety. First of all, vulnerable subjects should be excluded but in most of the case, out of blood pressure measurement may be practical. There is a controversy related to the equivalent blood pressures among clinic, home, and ambulatory blood pressure. In terms of the controversy, the central issues is the magnitude of white-coat according to the level of given clinic blood pressure level. There are two well known extremes. The one is the clinic blood pressure
around 140/90 mmHg. In this case, the white-coat effect as the average will be 5 mmHg which generate the corresponding home and ambulatory blood pressure of 135/85 mmHg. The other is automated office blood pressure (AOBP) of 120 mmHg. In this case, interestingly, reverse white-coat effect as the average greater than 5 mmHg which generate corresponding ambulatory blood pressure of 125 mmHg. But in AOBP, in which white-coat effect is almost eliminated seems to be much different from usual clinic BP. In HYVET study in which whitecoat
effect was so high that clinic blood pressure around 140 mmHg corresponded to ambulatory blood pressure of 125 mmHg. For intensive blood pressure lowering below 130 mmHg by clinic blood pressure, corresponding home and ambulatory blood pressure are 130 mmHg with the assumption that the white-coat hypertension was excluded by AOBP or out of office blood pressure measurement. There are some issues for the corresponding home blood pressure, specifically, the protocol for the resting time could make significant difference. Home blood pressures in STEP study corresponds to the achieved blood pressure in intensive treatment arm needs to be investigated.